May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser. 
Photo: Geir Mogen, NTNU.May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser. Photo: Geir Mogen, NTNU

Norwegian scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Last updated: 08.10.2014 // Three neuroscientists, including the married couple May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser from Norway, have won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain.

This is wonderful news for May-Britt and Edvard Moser, but also for NTNU and Norway, said rector at Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) Gunnar Bovim in a press release from the university.

The Norwegian scientist couple share the award with Professor John O’Keefe from the University College of London. This is the first time the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to Norwegians, and May-Britt Moser is only the 11th woman to have won the medicine prize since it was first awarded in 1901.

Discovery of an “inner GPS” in the brain

A press release from the Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet says that this year’s Nobel Laureates have discovered a positioning system, an “inner GPS” in the brain that makes it possible to orient ourselves in space, demonstrating a cellular basis for higher cognitive function.

The Nobel Laureates' discoveries have solved a problem that has perplexed philosophers and researchers for centuries: How the brain creates a map of the space around us, and how it enables us to navigate complex surroundings.

You can read more about the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, and the three awarded neuroscientist, here and here.


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